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03/06/2014 - Ray Parker Jr. - Ray Parker Jr. Honored with a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on March 6, 2014 - Hollywood Walk of Fame - Hollywood, CA, USA - Keywords: Musician, California, WOF, Walk Of Fame, Arts Culture and Entertainment, Attending, Celebrities, Celebrity Orientation: Portrait Face Count: 1 - False - Photo Credit: Andrew Evans / PR Photos - Contact (1-866-551-7827) - Portrait Face Count: 1

Ray Parker Jr

Musician Ray Parker Jr. (C) reacts as his Star is unveiled in Hollywood, California on March 6, 2014. Parker was the recipient of the 2,518th star in the Category of Recording along the Hollywood Walk of Fame. AFP PHOTO/Frederic J. BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)

Ray Parker received a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame March 6, 2014. PopSource TV News was on location and witnessed Ray Parker Jr. receiving his Star, an honor so deserving of a man of many talents.

The famed musician received the 2,518th star in the Category of Recording. Parker has decades of industry credits as a songwriter, musician, producer, guitarist and hitmaker. As reported by Andrew Barker from Variety, his famed hit “Ghostbusters,” went on to top the Billboard singles chart for three straight weeks.

Of course, long before he made “Who you gonna call?” an international catchphrase, Parker, who’ll be 60 in May, was one of the first names on the Motown call sheet as a studio guitarist. At age 13, he played his first gigs at Detroit’s legendary 20 Grand club, backing up the likes of the Spinners, the Temptations and Gladys Knight. He cut his first studio session — at the behest of legendary Motown songwriting team Holland-Dozier-Holland — at 16. And by 18, he was playing with Stevie Wonder on a national tour with the Rolling Stones.

Parker’s stock as a studio player rose further when he moved to California, sleeping at Lamont Dozier’s house and later following him from Motown to Hot Wax Records, where he played on his first No. 1 track, Honey Cone’s “Want Ads.”

“He would play certain high riffs on the high strings with this very unique touch,” Dozier remembers. “Like B.B. King has those distinctive licks, Ray came up with these figures that he became well known for. They were so ‘Ray Parker.’ There are certain guitar players where you just know they’re on certain sessions just by hearing it, and he’s one of those guys.”
It took well over a decade for Parker to fully break out as a solo artist — which he did with the help of Clive Davis, whom Parker calls his “personal Moses” — and only after he’d proven his songwriting chops penning tunes for Barry White, Chaka Khan and Leo Sayer. Though it was never for lack of ambition that he stayed behind the scenes.

“I used to walk around in those days with a black T-shirt that had gold letters that said: ‘I’m a Fucking Genius.’ I used to wear it everywhere,” Parker recalls. “I’ve never wanted to blend in. I was always kind of a big-mouthed guy, from the Muhammad Ali school.”

Recording as Raydio, Parker notched a top 10 hit right off the blocks with 1978’s “Jack and Jill,” and reached No. 4 under his own name with 1982’s “The Other Woman.”

 

 Source: Walk of Fame, Getty Images